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Nova Scotia Published: February 23, 2011
The peninsula of Nova Scotia was a continual source of conflict between France and Britain from the establishment of its first settlement by France at Port Royal (1605) until France was driven completely from North America in the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763).
Norwegian immigration Published: February 23, 2011
Norway was the number one source country for Scandinavian immigration to North America, and second only to famine-ravaged Ireland in percentage of its population to immigrate.
North West Company Published: February 23, 2011
The North West Company was, according to journalist and historian Peter Newman, “the first North American business to operate on a continental scale.”
North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Published: February 23, 2011
The North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) of 1994 created a unified market of more than 370 million people with goods and services totaling $6.5 trillion annually.
Nigerian immigration Published: February 23, 2011
Nigeria is the number one source country for West African immigrants coming to the United States and is second to Ghana for immigration to Canada.
Nicaraguan immigration Published: February 23, 2011
As a result of an ongoing and integral U.S. involvement with the politics of Nicaragua from the 1850s, a unique set of circumstances has brought a variety of Nicaraguan immigrants to the United States.
New York colony Published: February 23, 2011
New Amsterdam, conquered by England in 1664, was the heart of the Dutch commercial empire in North America (New Netherland).
New York, New York Published: February 23, 2011
From its earliest days, New Amsterdam, the precursor to New York City, was one of the most heterogeneous places on earth.
New Orleans, Louisiana Published: February 23, 2011
New Orleans was one of the most important ports of entry for immigration to the United States during the 19th century, mainly because of its location at the mouth of the Mississippi River, which provided ready access to the interior of country.
New Jersey colony Published: February 23, 2011
Originally part of the newly conquered territory of New Netherland, in 1664, New Jersey was granted by James, Duke of York (later James II) as a proprietary colony to John, Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret.
New immigration Published: February 23, 2011
New immigration is a term principally applied to the United States, designating a shift in the most common immigrant groups.
New Hampshire colony Published: February 23, 2011
An early area of contention between France and England, the region of modern New Hampshire was gradually settled mainly by English immigrants and became a prime shipbuilding area for the British.
New France Published: February 23, 2011
New France was the name of the French colonial empire in North America.
Newfoundland Published: February 23, 2011
Newfoundland comprises the island of Newfoundland and the nearby coast of the mainland region of Labrador.
New Brunswick Published: February 23, 2011
Europeans first settled the New Brunswick region of Canada in 1604, when Frenchmen SAMUEL DE CHAMPLAIN and Pierre du Gua, sieur de Monts, established a fur-trading settlement on St. Croix Island.
Navigation acts Published: February 23, 2011
The navigation acts were a number of related legislative measures passed between 1651 and 1696 and designed to enhance Britain’s international economic position.
Naturalization Acts (United States) (1790, 1795) Published: February 23, 2011
The Naturalization Act of 1790 was the first piece of U.S. federal legislation regarding immigration.
Naturalization Act (United States) (1802) Published: February 23, 2011
When Thomas Jefferson became president, there was a relaxation of the hostility toward immigrants that had prevailed during the administration of John Adams (1797–1801).